paddychakra
paddychakra
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vivipiuomeno:

Tomoko Sawada, Japanese performer - Early Days No.31
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vivipiuomeno:

Tomoko Sawada, Japanese performer - Early Days No.32
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aldoasat:


Mujer Con Palos / Woman With Sticks on Flickr.
Mujer Con Palos / Woman With Sticks
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trollong:


Ron Mueck
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cavetocanvas:


Ron Mueck, Untitled (Old Woman in Bed), 2000-2002
From the Art Gallery of NSW:

As with all of Mueck’s sculpture, this figure is more than life-like. The moist eyes, veins just below the skin and flushed cheeks all add up to an near palpable sense of life, or in this work of life ebbing. We almost expect to hear a rattling breath as we look at the work for signs of the life that is about to end. The realism of his sculptures is like a series of three-dimensional freeze frames taken from the world, life momentarily paused but still fully evident. This filmic metaphor is not inappropriate as Mueck has worked as a modelmaker for television and film. While we know these people are sculptures, it is almost impossible not to touch them to make sure that they are indeed not real. Mueck’s deployment of scale distances this realism just as it entices us by the sense of wonder it evokes. The expressions of his sculptural subjects are subtly exaggerated to increase their emotional impact; indeed their heightened emotional and psychological states and the response this triggers in the viewer is the subject of Mueck’s art rather than their extraordinary verisimilitude. His figures are almost always alone and there is a strong sense of isolation and vulnerability to many of his works.
cavetocanvas:


Ron Mueck, Untitled (Old Woman in Bed), 2000-2002
From the Art Gallery of NSW:

As with all of Mueck’s sculpture, this figure is more than life-like. The moist eyes, veins just below the skin and flushed cheeks all add up to an near palpable sense of life, or in this work of life ebbing. We almost expect to hear a rattling breath as we look at the work for signs of the life that is about to end. The realism of his sculptures is like a series of three-dimensional freeze frames taken from the world, life momentarily paused but still fully evident. This filmic metaphor is not inappropriate as Mueck has worked as a modelmaker for television and film. While we know these people are sculptures, it is almost impossible not to touch them to make sure that they are indeed not real. Mueck’s deployment of scale distances this realism just as it entices us by the sense of wonder it evokes. The expressions of his sculptural subjects are subtly exaggerated to increase their emotional impact; indeed their heightened emotional and psychological states and the response this triggers in the viewer is the subject of Mueck’s art rather than their extraordinary verisimilitude. His figures are almost always alone and there is a strong sense of isolation and vulnerability to many of his works.
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(via Fondation Cartier – Mémoires Vives)
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artpropelled:


(by daniel molina)
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likeafieldmouse:

Cindy Wright
likeafieldmouse:

Cindy Wright
likeafieldmouse:

Cindy Wright
likeafieldmouse:

Cindy Wright
likeafieldmouse:

Cindy Wright
likeafieldmouse:

Cindy Wright
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p-dress:

Rufen Afanador • Torero’s shoes. From The book ‘Torero - Matadors of Colombia, Mexico, Peru and Spain Torero’ - 2001
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p-dress:

 cynthiafusillo.blogspot.com
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rrrdiaz:

A MATTER OF FACT
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c0ssette:

Gerrit van Honthorst - Saint Sebastian,detail, ca.1623.
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